How to Take Charge of Your Own Learning – Master List #futurereadylearning


This post is part of a series by Michelle Ockers outlining different ways of taking charge of your own learning.  It was developed following delivery of a keynote on the topic ‘Future Ready Learning’ to provide resources for participants to explore approaches covered briefly in the keynote.  Michelle can be contacted regarding keynote speaking on this theme at Michelle@michelleockers.com 

There are many ways to take charge of your own learning.  One way of identifying your options is to look at three broad approaches:

  • Learning from yourself
  • Leraning from resources
  • Learning from others

For ideas about how you can learn, tools and links to further resources choose from the list below.  Select a hyperlinked item for further information.  You can use this post as a master list to access posts on each item.

Note – I am writing these posts as a follow-on action from a keynote presentation on Future Ready Learning at a professional development conference in February 2018.  I will gradually add linked posts on all items in coming weeks.  Consider this a ‘work in progress’ which I am sharing as it is developed so that people can start using it immediately and provide me with feedback and suggested improvements.  If you have any comments or suggestions please message me via Twitter, LinkedIn or email (Michelle@michelleockers.com).

The image below shows some of the ways of learning that I will add to this master list.


Learning From Yourself

Learning from yourself consists of both doing and reflecting.  They are complimentary, iterative actions.

Doing

To be added

Reflecting 

Reflection is a powerful way to learn from our own experience.  It is a process of thinking about a past event and thinking about what happened and what you can learn from it.  We can reflect either with others or on our own.  We also have the option of keeping individual reflection private or sharing it with others.

While you can reflect in your head, it can be very helpful to make a record  both to improve the quality of your thinking and to have a record that can reviewed at a later time to gain further insight as you look for patterns and further learning.

Learning From Resources

Resources for learning come in a wide range of forms.  This list predominantly covers online resources.  It will also cover books (which can be consumed electronically or in hard copy).

Online Resources

One of the great things about the internet is that it’s given us access to an incredible amount of resources and content.  This is also one of the really challenging things about the internet.  To get the most out of online resources requires that you can find good quality content relevant to your needs.  Fortunately there are tools available to help with this and skills that you can develop to critically evaluate sources.  You will also find your online network will assist you with this both directly and indirectly through their use of common tools that enable resources to be readily shared between people with common interests.

Skills to develop:

Types of resources to explore:

  • Blogs
  • Website resources
  • Subscription sites – courses and toolkits
  • Youtube
  • MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses)
  • Webinars

Content tools:

  • Social bookmarking
  • Feed readers (e.g. Feedly)

Books

To be added

Learning From Others

To be added

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