The Relationship between Employee and Customer Experience


Since it was published in March 2018 I’ve found myself dipping in and out of the excellent Deakin report ‘Enabling the Future of Work.’  It is a clear analysis of key trends impacting the future of work and implications for Learning and Development (L&D) professionals.

One theme in the Deakin report is the rise of human experience.  The obvious manifestation of this is the increasing expectations of customers.  Most organisations have customer experience as a key element in their strategy.  For this strategy to be truly effective there needs to be a parallel emphasis on employee experience.  (Refer to page 8 of the Deakin report for their thoughts on implications for L&D.)

I’m currently delving into the implications of Artificial Intelligence and the augmented worker.  I’d like to form a view of what AI means for how people work and how to support them to learn and perform into the future.  While jotting down some thoughts on this question last week I drew up a concept I called the ‘Experience Value Chain Continuum’ (yes, a bit clunky – but work in progress).  My diagram has employees/workers (noting increasing use of non-employees as part of many organisation’s workforce) at one end of the continuum and customers at the other end.

Yesterday Renetta Alexander shared an article via Twitter that did a much better job at describing the relationship between customer and employee experience.  Michel Hogan calls it the ‘employee and customer experience loop‘.  She depicts is as either a ‘doom loop’ or a ‘virtuous cycle.’

In the absence of a diagram in this article I’ve created a new one myself.  It’s a simple representation of the concept of an amplifying relationship between customer experience and employee experience.  (I’ve used symbology from the field of system dynamics which is a field that looks at the relationships of events or activities separated by space and time.  Could be the start of a bigger model looking at the interplay of these two dimensions of human experience.)

 

 

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